It’s not the whiney little bitch conversation we need to have.

It’s not the whiney little bitch conversation we need to have. It’s The One About Impotence Instead. by Joanna Intara   I love Bill Maher. He’s amazing, funny, talented and brilliant. And the whiney little bitch conversation has been on the table for a long time....

Develop your Emotions for Success and Happiness.

Develop your Emotions for Success and Happiness. By Shirley Palmer    We probably all know people, either at work or in our personal lives, who are really good listeners. No matter what kind of situation we’re in, they always seem to know just what to say – and...

Luck or Divine Appointment?

Luck or Divine Appointment? Christine Saunders  &  Jonathan Darling    Christine: Imagine your life today without a friend, a spouse, or even an experience that has made your life better. If you think back to the very moment you have met one of these people,...

Balanced Mind, Inspired Heart.

Balanced Mind, Inspired Heart. By Samareh Rahnavardi   According to studies and researches we know that women have 52% less serotonin in their brain than men do and that is how we are designed, therefore they may get upset or worried deeper or hold grudges and...

One Tribe Magazine – March 2019 – Issue 18

One Tribe Magazine – March 2019 – Issue 18 The definitive style magazine for MIND, BODY and SOUL. One Tribe Magazine will transform the way you see yourself and the world around you. So, get ready to LOVE YOUR LIFE, as our creative writers take you on an adventure and...
MENUMENU
  • Home
  • Personal Development
    • Figuring out what’s most important when it comes to self-help, personal development, or self-improvement can be tricky, so at One Tribe Magazine, we have collaborated with some of the worlds most inspirational writers to help you discover the many possibilities of living a happy and rewarding life.

    • Develop your Emotions for Success and Happiness.

      Develop your Emotions for Success and Happiness.

      Develop your Emotions for Success and Happiness. By Shirley Palmer    We probably all know people, either at work or in our personal lives, who are really good listeners. No matter what kind of situation we’re in, they always seem to know just what to say – and...

      Luck or Divine Appointment?

      Luck or Divine Appointment?

      Luck or Divine Appointment? Christine Saunders  &  Jonathan Darling    Christine: Imagine your life today without a friend, a spouse, or even an experience that has made your life better. If you think back to the very moment you have met one of these people,...

      Balanced Mind, Inspired Heart.

      Balanced Mind, Inspired Heart.

      Balanced Mind, Inspired Heart. By Samareh Rahnavardi   According to studies and researches we know that women have 52% less serotonin in their brain than men do and that is how we are designed, therefore they may get upset or worried deeper or hold grudges and...

  • The Magazine
    • One Tribe Magazine will transform the way you see yourself and the world around you. So, get ready to LOVE YOUR LIFE, as our creative writers take you on an adventure and share fresh perspectives, inspiring stories and simple easy-to-follow steps, that will help you through life’s many challenges.

    • One Tribe Magazine – March 2019 – Issue 18

      One Tribe Magazine – March 2019 – Issue 18

      One Tribe Magazine – March 2019 – Issue 18 The definitive style magazine for MIND, BODY and SOUL. One Tribe Magazine will transform the way you see yourself and the world around you. So, get ready to LOVE YOUR LIFE, as our creative writers take you on an adventure and...

      One Tribe Magazine – February 2019 – Issue 17

      One Tribe Magazine – February 2019 – Issue 17

      One Tribe Magazine – February 2019 – Issue 17 The definitive style magazine for MIND, BODY and SOUL. One Tribe Magazine will transform the way you see yourself and the world around you. So, get ready to LOVE YOUR LIFE, as our creative writers take you on an adventure...

      One Tribe Magazine – January 2019 – Issue 16

      One Tribe Magazine – January 2019 – Issue 16

      One Tribe Magazine – January 2019 – Issue 16 The definitive style magazine for MIND, BODY and SOUL. One Tribe Magazine will transform the way you see yourself and the world around you. So, get ready to LOVE YOUR LIFE, as our creative writers take you on an adventure...

      One Tribe Magazine – December 2018 – Issue 15

      One Tribe Magazine – December 2018 – Issue 15

        One Tribe Magazine – December 2018 – Issue 15 The definitive style magazine for MIND, BODY and SOUL. One Tribe Magazine will transform the way you see yourself and the world around you. So, get ready to LOVE YOUR LIFE, as our creative writers take you on an...

  • Services
  • Authors

Adsense

FREE the nipple.

Remove the taboo that we place on women’s nipples.

By Bianca Spears.

 

Early in my pregnancy, I held back in sharing any bump photos on social media or even with family. I’d barely even taken any because I felt a bit weird with the changes going on in my body. My bump looked a little like a gut at times, and perhaps even, as my dad had joked, looked like I’d “had a few too many beers”. I think that proportions played a huge role in that; at five weeks pregnant, I was bursting from my bra and at seven weeks I had gone up 2.5 cups from a D to buying an E and F bra (because the E was not going to last long)!

I was suddenly back at the bra size I’d been was when I was sixteen, my emotions and mind re-entering that time and place where shirts hung awkwardly off my chest like some kind of verandah to my body below, where I had to go into the fugly-granny-bra section or spend a fortune on nice lingerie, where I could not buy matching bikinis, I had to find separates. 

Back then, I was known (of the two Biancas at school) as “the one with the big boobs”. The boys loved to watch me sprint on sports day, and not because I was quick, but because of the Baywatch-like bounce that occurred when I ran down the track. My friends laughed when I stood above lights in the pavements because my face was fully shadowed while theirs looked like they had a torch shining upon it from below.

Don’t get me wrong, I was confident and definitely not tormented or traumatised by this, but it was an identity I wanted to get away from. I did not want me or my life to be defined by my breasts. 

I remember talking to my Mum and her friend about the idea of getting a breast reduction one day, in what seemed to be a casual conversation. I didn’t think at the time that anything would come from it, though just a few weeks later, we were at the surgeon’s having a consultation. I made the decision and had a reduction within six months of that, knowing that they are breasts – they would grow and change and fluctuate with weight and pregnancy etc. throughout my life. I knew that I was young and that I had not finished growing, and I actually did grow another cup size or two after the surgery.

It was interesting to notice how fourteen years later, as a pregnant 30-year-old adult, the mindset and habits of the teenage me crept back in. I was right back there with the frequent awkwardness of choosing what to wear and the tendency to try to hide them;  this time, taking comfort in knowing that I could kind of “blame” the size of them on the pregnancy, that they would not be defined by others as a part of the “normal” me. 

As confident as someone may be, we can all have hang-ups about little things, and those little things can consume our time, thoughts and energy. They can hold us back from doing what we want to do and being who we want to be.

A few months further into the pregnancy, there I was, naked on a beach in Melbourne, with photographer Vienna Chiron snapping her shutter on the rawness and realness of me in my skin. The body that had stretched and grown as it grew a new human within it, the scars, the lumps, the bumps, the little hairs standing on end in the cold… it was all on display, and I felt so free. 

Playing in the waves and dancing in the setting sun, natural, the way I was born felt right, it felt natural. The shots that Vienna captured were truly gorgeous, I was in love with them…but then, when I thought about sharing them, the stories of our culture crept into my mind: “I shouldn’t share them, it’s wrong to share them, my Dad and uncles, my friends and people I didn’t even know should not see them. They don’t want to see them. What would my Dad think? What would my partner think? I should be ashamed!” 

I felt confused. Were these thoughts and beliefs were mines or whether they were borrowed from society? If I believed them, why? and did I need to believe them? The thought process continued: well maybe if I cropped the images so it’s not showing any bits it’d be OK, maybe if I darkened the silhouette and you couldn’t see the outline/colour of my nipple it’d be OK…so basically if I hid, it’d be OK, acceptable, shareable, understood, accepted. Thankfully Vienna, who doesn’t airbrush her images and only edits to bring the colours and clarity back to what was originally there in the moment, wasn’t going to be part of that. She told me in no uncertain terms that if I was going to edit or filter the images, “don’t tag me”. I got that message loud and clear. I totally understood that it would misrepresent the very nature of her work and the Unveil Experience, which is all about being witnessed in your vulnerability and absolute beauty in communion with nature, discovering the depth of self-worth and love you have within you. In fact, I’d be undermining the very reason I wanted to work with her in the first place. 

I sat in this uncomfortable, undecided limbo for a bit, during which I read a post by Vienna about the ban that Instagram has on female nipples, and that one of her posts (which showed only a sliver of a woman’s nipple) had been removed. She called to the audience to “Free the Nipple” and remove the taboo that we place on women’s nipples, while men’s are obviously fine to be shown in public. It got me asking myself: Why are men’s nipples G-rated and somewhat family-friendly, while women’s breasts, despite being the bearers of the rich milk that gave us sustenance as babies, are considered X-rated in media? I totally agreed that women’s and men’s nipples should be considered equal as far as exposure goes. I agreed with every cell in my body, yet I felt dread in my gut, knowing what that meant for me. If I believed that, saying it was not enough. Saying it and preaching it while hiding wouldn’t be living in alignment with my values. Saying it wasn’t enough to lead the way and to create actual change within myself or the world. 

When we hide, we are playing into fear, and as a human, as a woman, as a leader and a Mum, I choose to live bigger than that.  

Let your vibe attract your tribe.